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Children today are under enormous pressures rarely experienced by their parents or grandparents. Many of today's children are being enticed to grow up too quickly and are encountering challenges for which they are totally unprepared.

Many clinicians find it easier to tell parents their child has a brain-based disorder than suggest parenting changes. Jennifer Harris (psychiatrist)

"Cutting" is a visible sign to the world that you are hurting.

Good parenting requires sacrifice. Childhood lasts for only a few brief years , but it should be given priority while it is passing before your eyes

You cannot reason with someone who is being unreasonable.

There has been an explosion in the prescribing of medication for very young children, particularly preschool and kindergarten boys (Juli Zito , Univ. of Maryland)

The way we talk to our children becomes their inner voice. (Peggy O'Mara)

"Moody" and "unpredictable" are adjectives parents will often use when referring to their teenagers.

Children mimic well. They catch what they see better than they follow what they hear.

Simple rules adhered to when children are young can prevent more serious problems later.

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“Executive Dysfunction” and ADHD

“Executive dysfunction” means an individual has difficulty “stopping” and taking the time to think through the possible consequences of an action and selecting one that is best. Another way of saying this is the child is very “impulsive”. By definition a child with ADHD has “executive dysfunction”. Our goal in helping him is to get him to “stop” long enough for the executive function to kick in. There are a number of approaches to facilitate [...]

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Helping a Teen Moderate Stress

  HELPING A TEEN MODERATE & MANAGE STRESS                           “SPIT”  HAPPENS !   1. Listen                                   – without judging                   – try to understand and appreciate their concern                   – if event resulted from bad behaviour or poor judgment – it’s vital to avoid making matters worse by berating and punishing                         [...]

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FASD – Mental Retardation

Mental retardation is the most debilitating feature of FASD but only about 50% of them actually fall into the retarded range of intelligence (IQ blow 70) This can present a significant problem to individuals with FASD because they may need special services but they do not qualify because their IQ scores are not below the cut off point and therefore not be diagnosed with FASD. A diagnosis can be useful because it makes it easier [...]

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Frequently Asked Questions about ADD/ADHD

1. Is it true that boys have ADHD more often than girls? The short answer is “yes” – 3 to 6 times more boys. The longer answer is that girls may be under diagnosed because they typically display less severe social problems. Boys are more at risk of developing almost every behavioural or emotional problem. 2. Do ADHD children also have other significant problems? Yes. The following is an incomplete list of problems commonly seen [...]

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you [...]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First [...]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain [...]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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Contact

2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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Parents' Comments

“Our daughter was the joy of our life until she turned 13, then all hell broke loose. Rick helped us understand what was happening to her and we made some adjustments that helped us get through it. She’s now in University and doing well.”

(D.A. – St. Thomas)