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Good parenting requires sacrifice. Childhood lasts for only a few brief years , but it should be given priority while it is passing before your eyes

Hurt people hurt people.

Some hope their children will be like sponges soaking up the truth and wisdom imparted by their parents. However appealing this philosophy might be, it seldom seems to catch on with their children.

Parents are the external regulator for kids who cannot regulate themselves.

Simple rules adhered to when children are young can prevent more serious problems later.

We should not medicate the boys so they fit the school; we should change the school to fit the boy. (Leonard Sax, M.D. Ph.D)

If it  was going to be easy to raise kids, it never would have started with something called "labour".

Parenting style matters - a lot!

"Moody" and "unpredictable" are adjectives parents will often use when referring to their teenagers.

When a child is disregulated - is the time parents need to be regulated.

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Caregiving – FASD (part 3)

3 steps to managing children with FASD a) Recognize that FASD is a medical condition – FASD is not a bad attitude – it must be treated as a medical condition – society has denied this reality of FASD and blames the indivivual – “just sit down and behave” is unrealistic – punishing a child with FASD for brain damage is useless – society (homes, schools, treatment centres, hospitals, jail) seldom provide adequate     [...]

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FASD Caregivers (part 2) – often times an invisible handicap

Often times individuals with FASD do not display the physical features associated with FASD. Their appearance does not  give any hint of the neurological problems that are hidden. Individuals with invisible handicaps are: easy to forget about their limitations easy to not provide compassion, understanding and forgiveness Children and adults with FASD need incredible amounts of: consistency reinforcement creativity time compassion understanding perseverance forgiveness repetition The more dysfunctional – the more of EVERYTHING

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FASD – What Can a Caregiver Do? (part 1)

It is easy for us to to fail to recognize and respect the struggle and courage it takes for someone with FASD to make it through the day! We must remember: that irreversible brain damage occurred before birth FASD individuals will not “will power” their way out of it caregivers cannot “love” their way out of it children with FASD are difficult to rear and teach BUT IT IS NOT IMPOSSIBLE

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What Does Depression in Young People Look Like?

The following is an excerpt from a book by Carol Fitzpatrick and John Sharry. Case Study: “Debbie, aged 13, has not been to school for 8 weeks. She got the flu 3 months ago and was out of school for a week. She was determined to get back as quickly as possible as she is a conscientious student who works very hard and who likes to be and expects to be at the top of [...]

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Myths vs Facts – Suicide

MYTH VERSUS FACT Knowing truth from fiction can make the difference! Myth: Teens who talk about suicide never do. Fact: Most of the time, people who attempt suicide have   provided significant clues to their intentions.   Myth: Nothing can stop someone once he has decided  to take his own life. Fact: Most adolescents who contemplate suicide are torn. They are in pain and want their suffering to end.  They don’t necessarily want to die [...]

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you [...]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First [...]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain [...]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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Contact

2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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Parents' Comments

“Our psychiatrist recommended Rick to help us sort out behaviour management issues for our autistic son. He was an invaluable help.”

(C.C. – Sarnia)